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Abstract

Although both constitutional theory and practical considerations offer powerful reasons for Congress and the President to prefer negotiation rather than litigation of separation of powers disputes, the Clinton Administration litigated and lost several important cases dealing with presidential power. Some commentators have suggested that these rulings will undermine the presidency for years after Clinton leaves office. Professor Entin assesses some factors, notably the phenomenon of divided government, that might have contributed to the difficulty of reaching interbranch accommodations in recent years and suggests that the long-term implications of the adverse judicial rulings may be less severe than the pessimists fear.

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